Friday, 23 February 2018

The Coming March Update in New Eden

CCP is pretty good about telegraphing what they are going to do with their expansions and updates.  They have a long history of dev blogs and forum posts about proposed features and have shown themselves to be responsive to feedback.  Of course, the latter is always a hazard, because if CCP bows to somebody’s logic then somebody else with a different view of things will start crying “foul!” or “favoritism” or “fake news!” or whatever the term du jour is.

I tend to believe CCP operates in good faith, in part because changing your mind in front of a live studio audience tends to be a painful experience and, as noted, makes people mad.  It would be much easier to do this in a smoke filled back room and announce the results as edicts not up for discussion. It works for Blizzard.

Anyway, in the grand scheme of things now, CCP has month updates which tend to tune a few things and maybe add a feature, and expansions, which are the vehicle for big changes and spanking new features.  Citadels and Alpha accounts go with expansions, ship re-balancing and in-game events and changes to how you blow up a citadel go with updates.

But now I am looking at the mounting number of things planned for the March update and it seems like a lot.  There isn’t any single item that seems out of scope for the above rules.  Rather, there are so many things with such impact that it is starting to feel like more than an update.

First there was a dev blog about ship balance changes that opened with these two points that came out of the recent CSM summit:

  1. More change is better, even if it’s small
  2. The meta is feeling stagnant, particularly around Feroxes and the Marchariel

So, yes, both the Mach and the Ferox are taking a hit.  I always feel a bit sad for the Ferox when it gets knocked down as it was, for a long stretch, completely nonviable in the fleet meta where Drakes and Hurricanes ruled back in the day.  But now it is on the decline.

Meanwhile CCP has been trying to beat down the Mach for a while now, reducing the blueprint copy drops and boosting the cost to make them.  But the Russians have been farming those blueprints for so long that the supply is effectively endless.  As for raising the cost to make… do you even read the monthly economic report bro?  So CCP is now set to clip its wings a bit hoping to push this faction battleship back towards being a rare bling-mobile rather than its current status as a ship of the line for nearly every major coalition.

There were other ships getting specific tweaks while tech 1 battleships got an across the board boost:

  • +25% to cargo capacity
  • +20% to maximum lock range

Because why not I guess.

The dev blog also introduced the Flag cruiser concept, a hardened FC ship, in response to the ongoing drone about FC headshotting. (A topic covered for Blog Banter 76 a couple years back.)

The Monitor Flag Cruiser concept

You can see the proposed stats, as well as the community response, in this forum thread.   The debate is heated and one common item that keeps coming up is the lack of a way for an FC on this ship to get on kill mails.  We shall see where this ends up.  Right now it seems like a niche ship for very specific circumstances.

While that was still in the air another note came from CCP about removing the built-in voice chat from EVE Online.  This is apparently another item in the way of a 64-bit client.  Built-in voice chat was very much the thing a decade back and CCP, like SOE and a few others, went to Vivox for an integration. (I found out at GDC that the Vivox people came from the same speech/voice corner of tech I have dwelt in for most of my career.)  EVE Voice came in with the Revelations expansion back in November 2006 (high level list of features on the EVE Uni Wiki, but the actual Revelations 1.0 patch notes for the release went missing with the update to the community site) and has been lightly used ever since, with CCP declaring that only 0.4% of the players giving it a shot.  Of course, we’re finding out now who depends on it, but for the most part you were more likely to use the captain’s quarters than EVE Voice.

Then there was word of a new chat back end coming with the March update.  CCP will move to a centralized independent chat service that should make things better for somebody.  Currently one of the ways to improve your client performance in a big fleet fight is to close Local, even when TEST isn’t involved.  Maybe this will help with that, though it sounds like it won’t change anything you dislike about the in-game part of the chat system.

Then a huge dev blog dropped… huge if you’re in null sec at least… about changes to entosis, tethering, and a 95% reduction in jump fatigue.  This was greeted with both cheers and speculation as to whether or not all of CCP had been replaced by pod people or something, this being a heady and unexpected change.

The jump fatigue change, a game mechanic introduced with the Phoebe update in late 2014 because null sec was stagnant and needed a change, will drop the cap for overall fatigue (blue timer) from 4 days to 5 hours and the jump clock (orange timer) from a maximum of 9.6 hours to 30 minutes… because, no doubt, null sec is stagnant and needs a change.

Will 30 minutes be enough of a roadblock to keep titan fleets from ranging across the map, moving from citadel to citadel in great packs?  Or will the jump range limitations that came in with jump fatigue be enough?  As I tend to say, we shall see.

Finally, in what I suspect is the final package of things for the March release, there was also a forum post of “little things” to be addressed.  The list, as it stands right now:

  • Color coding in Fleet watchlist window
  • Targeting bracket on Fleet mates is purple (the fleet color) rather than yellow
  • Text for broadcasts for reps now include what ship type the broadcast came from
  • Fleet tags are now displayed on the targets in the target bar
  • It’s now possible to remove a Fleet tags (from whatever was tagged before)
  • The results from ship scans are now organized by slots
  • The Show Info window for a solar system now has a special tab for structures in the system. Please note that like before, it only lists those structures you have docking access at.
  • The HQ listed in Show Info windows for corporation will now be a link
  • A tooltip has been added to the standing icon in the show info window to show what that icon is based on (player to player, player to corp, alliance to corp etc).
  • If your security status is -2 or lower, the tooltip on your security status in the Character sheet will tell you in which systems the faction police will attack
  • There’s now an option to have the Compare tool only list those attributes that differ for the items currently being compared
  • The height of the “Duration” drop down in market orders have been increased, so all entries fit without scrolling
  • The Salvage option for salvage drones has been moved to the top of the right click menu
  • Volume information has been added to the “material input” and “output” tooltips in the Industry window
  • The right click options that have been categorized as potentially especially destructive will now have a red ! in front of them. Among other things, we hope this helps to make it easier to differentiate between “Reprocess” and “Repackage”.

My favorite on the list is the ability to see the ship type that broadcasts for reps.  It isn’t that I don’t love you support frigates in the fleet, but I really need to keep DPS, my fellow logi, and the FC alive, after which I might have time to spare a couple of rep cycles for you.

Color coding the watch list will be good as well.  Currently I have a stack order for FC, main anchor, snowflakes, logi anchor, and cap chain partners that can get a little mixed up when things go sideways.

Anyway, as I was getting at a thousand words or so back, this seems like a lot for a monthly update.  It lacks a big anchor feature to make it an expansion, but for an update it has a lot of chewy goodness packed in.

Finally, I suspect that these updates coming now, after the winter CSM summit, are not a coincidence.  Good job CSM12!  I suspect that this update will feature in a few re-election campaigns.  But my real question is, does this mean having Sort Dragon speak up constantly during meetings is a good thing?  His name comes up a lot in the minutes.



from The Ancient Gaming Noob http://ift.tt/2EZLogB

Guide: Pokémon GO Raid Boss List - All Raid Bosses Listed By Tier

Guide: Guide: Pokémon GO Raid Boss List - All Raid Bosses Listed By Tier

Catch a legendary or two



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Share of the Week: Horizon Zero Dawn

Last week, we challenged you to take a creative eye to one of PS4’s biggest games released last year: Horizon Zero Dawn. While discovering the truth of Aloy’s past and taking down robot dinosaurs, you shared your best shots with us using the hashtags #PS4share and #PSBlog. Here are a few of the submissions that caught our eye.


@MikLSP took Aloy to new heights in this architecture-focused shot.


@DobbyPS4 created a unique portrait of Aloy, shot through an animal hologram in the Frozen Wilds DLC.


Aloy steadies her bow in this vibrant share from @TastyPizzaRolls.


We couldn’t resist giving a shout out to @dascalvin1, who submitted not one, but eight shots from his Bufferflies collection.

Head to #PS4Share and #PSBlog on Twitter or Instagram to see other spellbinding entries to this week’s theme. Want to be featured in the next Share of the Week? Our new theme will take us all the way to Egypt.

Theme: Assassin’s Creed Origins
Share by: 9am Pacific on Wednesday, February 28

While scaling pyramids and helping Bayek find the first order of Assassins, share your best shots using #PS4share and #PSBlog for a chance to be featured next week.



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Google Announces ARCore, the Android Equivalent to ARKit, and Updates to Google Lens

Last summer Apple announced ARKit at WWDC which rolled out along side iOS 11 in late September. By now everyone with a capable device has probably fiddled around with at least one game or app that uses ARKit in some way. I've found augmented reality games to be exceedingly gimmicky but apps like AR MeasureKit [Free] have been super useful in day to day diddling around with DIY projects at my house. Well, Google is playing catch-up with Apple with today's announcement of ARCore, Google's augmented reality SDK for Android.

It stands to reason that the release of ARCore means we might see more augmented reality stuff, as these days releasing a mobile app or game is all about blasting it out to as many devices as possible. According to Google, ARCore works on 100 million Android smartphones out in the wild, with "advanced" capabilities available on 13 super-recent Android devices like the Pixel 2, Galaxy S3, and similar. I've been digging around in the ARCore documentation to try to figure out just what "advanced" capabilities are specifically but haven't found much. Hopefully once developers start digging into actually implementing this we'll get some clarification.

Potentially more interesting when it comes to general purpose use is the updates to Google Lens which in my opinion is one of the coolest things Android does right now. Basically, it uses all sorts of fancy image analysis to to recognize text and all sorts of other things inside of photos you take to make finding them easier. With the Google Lens update it will recognize even more things. Google specifically mentions that soon it will be able to identify specific dog breeds in photos, types of flowers, and more.

This sort of thing feels like science fiction to me, as I have so many photos on my iPhone that are just lost in my camera roll. Being able to search for things like "photos with dachshunds" or similar is a killer feature I'm super excited for.



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Daily Deal - Dead Island Franchise, Up To 75% Off

Today's Deal: Save up to 75% on Dead Island Franchise!*

Look for the deals each day on the front page of Steam. Or follow us on twitter or Facebook for instant notifications wherever you are!

*Offer ends Sunday at 10AM Pacific Time


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Now Available on Steam - YUMENIKKI -DREAM DIARY-

YUMENIKKI -DREAM DIARY- is Now Available on Steam!

Yume Nikki has been hailed as one of the greatest (and most controversial) games ever created with RPG Maker. The new YUMENIKKI -DREAM DIARY- is not a remake, but a full reimagining of the original―reconstructed and enhanced using elements and styles of modern indie games.



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Learn to better understand your players' social values at GDC 2018

Come to GDC 2018 to see Riot Games' Tash Elliott and Jeffrey Burrell share how the League of Legends dev has researched and acted upon the social values their players have across the world. ...



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First Episode Of Dystopian Nightmare Orwell: Ignorance Is Strength Released

orwell.jpg
I've got this feeling, somebody's watching meee... Maybe that's because I've been spending time with dystopian adventure game Orwell: Ignorance is Strength.

Just like in the first season, you're stepping into the shoes of a government official in a top-secret department of the Orwell surveillance program. Spy on your fellow citizens to defend The Nation from danger. That is what you're doing, right? Right?

The first episode (out of three) starts with a political crisis threatening to plunge The Nation and its neighbour, Parges, into violent civil unrest. An officer of the Pargesian military has gone missing and the only clue is a phone call...

And that's where you come in: through surveillance of phone calls, messages, websites, computers, and mobile phones, you decide what information gets to be processed by the Orwell system and what is irrelevant. This is your subtle way of shaping the story, and of course it is all kinds of ethically questionable - as if the name Orwell wasn't a bit on the nose already.

The way you're interacting with the Orwell system allows us a brief and rather alarming glimpse at how the things we may perceive as objective are, in fact, malleable and way too easy to tamper with. And even if such a system is thankfully still in the realm of dystopian science fiction, it feels not too far off, frankly. I'd love to elaborate, but there's really no way to talk about Orwell's intricacies without spoiling the fun.

Once again, the game's slick low-poly presentation is intriguing and the story just draws you in. While the first season was pretty exciting from the get-go with its impending threat of terror attacks, season two slowly builds up towards an intricate tale of espionage and (possible) counter-espionage... and then it's over way too soon.

This first episode will probably take you around an hour to complete. I really hope the following episodes (which will be released every two weeks) are a little more fleshed out and can build on the rather excellent setup. Either way, it looks like Orwell has me in its grip once again.

You can purchase Orwell: Ignorance is Strength from GOG and Steam for $9.99. This gets you all three episodes as soon as they are released. For more information, visit the game's website and follow developer Osmotic Studios on Twitter.



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Big Call of Duty: WW2 patch nerfs quickscoping, speeds up gameplay

A big patch coming to Call of Duty: WW2 tomorrow speeds up competitive multiplayer gameplay and nerfs quickscoping.

Quickscoping is the act of using a sniper rifle to aim down sights before pullling the trigger at the first viable moment for what is hopefully a one hit kill. Those skilled in quickscoping can use it to devastating effect, turning a sniper rifle into a killing machine at medium and even close range engagements.

Quickscoping is the subject of much debate within the Call of Duty community, with some saying it should be scrubbed from the shooter entirely. After tomorrow's patch goes live, you'll find quickscoping with the Kar98k and the M1903, two of the more popular sniper rifles in Call of Duty: WW2, much harder as the ADS transition times for both guns have been nerfed.

Read more…



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Guide: Pokémon GO Castforms Explained: How To Get Each Forms And What They Mean

Guide: Guide: Pokémon GO Castforms Explained: How To Get Each Forms And What They Mean

Cast your net wide



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Legendary Creatures Kyogre and Groudon Have Returned To Pokémon GO For A Limited Time

News: Legendary Creatures Kyogre and Groudon Have Returned To Pokémon GO For A Limited Time

Another chance to add them to your team



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Yes, you really do have to pay for an extra character slot in Metal Gear Survive

Konami's Metal Gear Survive - the first in the Metal Gear series since creator Hideo Kojima's departure - is out in the UK today. It's an okay video game! But it also contains one of the more bizarre - and perhaps obnoxious - examples of microtransactions I've seen in a full price video game to date.

Metal Gear Survive contains a second currency powered by 'SV Coins' - coins that can only be purchased with real money - which enable access to XP boosters during your playthrough. All fairly mucky stuff, really, and nothing I'd condone - cosmetic items, at a push, are okay, though if you're willingly breaking your own game in exchange for cold hard cash I think you're admitting your progression system might be kind of broken already - but Metal Gear Survive does something fairly new to me.

In exchange for 1000 SV coins - around £7.99, seeing as that's how much a bundle of 1150 coins will cost you - you unlock access to an additional character slot. And that's the only way you can access an additional character slot.

Read more…



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Sumo Digital Responsible For Porting PAYDAY 2 To Switch

News: Sumo Digital Responsible For Porting PAYDAY 2 To Switch

Any port in a storm?



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'Dissembler' Review - Click-Clack I Was Making a Match

While it's true that not every pre-existing genre of game has adapted comfortably to touch controls, I feel like the puzzle genre has benefited tremendously from them. In some cases, there are puzzles that just wouldn't work properly with other methods of input. Other titles benefit simply from the improved tactility that comes from using your fingers directly on objects in the game. Granted, you're just mushing your finger against a piece of smooth glass no matter what the game is like, but the really great ones line up sound effects and visual flourishes to create the illusion that you're actually playing around with solid pieces.

Dissembler [$2.99], the latest from Boson X [$2.99] creator Ian MacLarty, could easily be played with standard control inputs. In fact, you can do just that already, as the game has been simultaneously released across a handful of platforms. And you know, I think it would be good in any case. It's an inventive puzzle game that works quite well, with a pleasing difficulty curve and just enough twists along the way to keep you engaged without having to go overboard on gimmicks. But I really believe this game is best when you can put your mitts on it directly, flipping the tiles with a flick of your finger as soothing clicks and clacks accompany the movements of the pieces.

There are a few different gameplay modes in Dissembler. The meat of the game is found in its Puzzles Mode, which challenges you to find the solution to more than 120 hand-crafted puzzles. The basic set-up is that you have a number of colored squares arranged into a single board. You can swap these squares with one of their neighbors if and only if doing so will cause three pieces or more of one color to touch each other. The matched pieces will disappear, as they are wont to in games like this, leaving you with a slightly misshapen board to deal with. Your ultimate goal is to completely clear the board of every piece. It sound simple enough, and on the earlier boards it is. But things get complicated quickly, and you'll have to think carefully about each move and how where it leaves the remaining pieces.

Once you're familiar with that, the game starts throwing a couple of curve balls your way. Pieces will start having multiple layers that need to be stripped away one a time, or tabs that limit the pieces they can match with. When these gimmicks combine with larger boards, more colors, and more complex arrangements, Dissembler starts to get some real bite to it. You always need to be thinking a few moves ahead and keeping a clear eye on where you think your last move will have to be. The nice thing is that in spite of the challenge, Dissembler is fairly low-pressure. You can take back as many moves as you want, the aesthetics are calming, and the game is kind enough to always have a few open puzzles for you to work on in case you get stuck.

The second mode is the Daily Mode, which works just like the Puzzles Mode but delivers six fresh levels to you each day. As in the main mode, these puzzles grade up in difficulty as you work through them, so the first puzzle of each day will always be quite easy and the last hair-pullingly difficult. If you get stumped by any of them, the solutions are made available the next day. That's just so you can kick yourself for missing something that was obvious in hindsight, really. Kidding aside, being able to see the solutions is quite helpful as you'll almost certainly run into a similar situation again down the road.

Finally, there's the Infinite Mode, and this one works a little differently from the others. After choosing one of two difficulty settings, you'll be presented with a square board made up of multi-layered tiles. Once again you're swapping the pieces to make matches, but here matched pieces don't disappear. They simply peel away their top layer. Your goal is to make as many matches as you can. If there aren't any matches possible, the game is over. In this mode it's extremely important to pay attention to the second layer of the pieces. You have all the time in the world to make each match, so there aren't many excuses for painting yourself into a corner. Your best scores here, provided you're playing on the higher difficulty, are tracked on a leaderboard in Game Center, making this a fun distraction once you've finished all of the available puzzles. It's not my favorite of the modes, but I'm glad it's here.

The presentation is clean and simple, with light music playing in the background and nicely-animated pieces. The sound effects are great, making it feel like you've really got a physical contraption in front of you. I was happy to see that the game includes a colorblind mode, something too many puzzle games leave out. The wildest thing is that the game is just a single purchase. No IAPs to unlock stages, no buying hints, no incentivized ads, and no stamina meter or anything resembling that sort of chicanery. It's just a good, pure puzzle game available at a fair price. The included puzzles take a while to complete, and the daily puzzles keep on delivering more bang for your buck.

Dissembler is one of those puzzle games that just feels good to play around with, but it backs that simple joy with a solid spate of puzzles and gameplay modes. Unlike this developer's previous games, I think this one is welcome to players of a variety of skill levels, too. If you're looking for a mellow puzzle game that will help pass the time without making extra demands on your wallet, you'll likely be quite pleased with what Dissembler has to offer.



from TouchArcade http://ift.tt/2olLeqh

First Episode Of Dystopian Nightmare Orwell: Ignorance Is Strength Released

orwell.jpg
I've got this feeling, somebody's watching meee... Maybe that's because I've been spending time with dystopian adventure game Orwell: Ignorance is Strength.

Just like in the first season, you're stepping into the shoes of a government official in a top-secret department of the Orwell surveillance program. Spy on your fellow citizens to defend The Nation from danger. That is what you're doing, right? Right?

The first episode (out of three) starts with a political crisis threatening to plunge The Nation and its neighbour, Parges, into violent civil unrest. An officer of the Pargesian military has gone missing and the only clue is a phone call...

And that's where you come in: through surveillance of phone calls, messages, websites, computers, and mobile phones, you decide what information gets to be processed by the Orwell system and what is irrelevant. This is your subtle way of shaping the story, and of course it is all kinds of ethically questionable - as if the name Orwell wasn't a bit on the nose already.

The way you're interacting with the Orwell system allows us a brief and rather alarming glimpse at how the things we may perceive as objective are, in fact, malleable and way too easy to tamper with. And even if such a system is thankfully still in the realm of dystopian science fiction, it feels not too far off, frankly. I'd love to elaborate, but there's really no way to talk about Orwell's intricacies without spoiling the fun.

Once again, the game's slick low-poly presentation is intriguing and the story just draws you in. While the first season was pretty exciting from the get-go with its impending threat of terror attacks, season two slowly builds up towards an intricate tale of espionage and (possible) counter-espionage... and then it's over way too soon.

This first episode will probably take you around an hour to complete. I really hope the following episodes (which will be released every two weeks) are a little more fleshed out and can build on the rather excellent setup. Either way, it looks like Orwell has me in its grip once again.

You can purchase Orwell: Ignorance is Strength from GOG and Steam for $9.99. This gets you all three episodes as soon as they are released. For more information, visit the game's website and follow developer Osmotic Studios on Twitter.



from IndieGames.com http://ift.tt/2omdklc

Blog: VR game design in Recreational Dreaming

An exploration of VR design tips, tricks, and principles by the designer of Recreational Dreaming, a "sleepwalking simulator" for the HTC Vive. ...



from Gamasutra News http://ift.tt/2HGo7yL

Live and let die: How apathy killed No One Lives Forever

"The game ran on the LithTech engine. So we started talking with Warner Bros. and Warner Bros. said, 'Well, it wouldn't be possible to do a deal with you because Activision has some ownership.'" ...



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World Conqueror X Will Forcibly Annex Your Nintendo Switch This March

News: World Conqueror X Will Forcibly Annex Your Nintendo Switch This March

Send three and fourpence, we're going to a dance



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Jettomero: Hero of the Universe Launches on PS4 Tuesday

Hello, I’m Gabriel, the lone developer of Jettomero: Hero of the Universe. I’m thrilled to be able to announce that on February 27, 2018 Jettomero will be landing on PS4 at last!

Jettomero has been my passion project for over 2 years. If I had to choose a genre to properly describe it I might go with “Meditative Narrative Toy”. Being a solo developer I was free to experiment and take risks with this game. I found the development process very organic; the feel, the look, the sound all formed around one another into something I think is unlike anything I’ve played before.

Jettomero: Hero of the Universe

Taking inspiration from such magical games as Hohokum, Noby Noby Boy and Proteus, I wanted to create something that was playful and beautiful. A strong aesthetic was something I strived for from the beginning and a friendly and accessible experience always sat at the core.

The visual style of the game is what most people notice right away about Jettomero. Through rigorous iteration I eventually settled on a striking comic-like look, drawing on a fantastic history of stylized galaxies from many amazing artists over the years. This style went on to shape many more elements of the game, in some ways Jettomero is a lot like an interactive comic book. The game’s flexible photo mode also provided a way to elaborate on various experiments, handing off a wide variety of filters to view and tweak at any moment.

Jettomero: Hero of the Universe

Jettomero: Hero of the UniverseJettomero: Hero of the Universe

As a musician, creating the soundtrack to Jettomero was a highlight for me. I knew from the start that I’d want to record everything using analog synthesizers and electronic drum machines. I recorded a lot of music for the game but all the final tracks are a cohesive down-tempo set, setting a dark but calming mood for the zen experience of the rest of the game.

While the soundtrack plays to the darker themes of Jettomero, the controls quickly became a very humorous endeavour. I’m not much of an animator myself so it worked out especially well that I developed a procedural animation system for Jettomero. The giant robot struggles to walk in a straight line and wobbles from left to right at every turn, but this played completely into a crucial aspect of the game’s story as well. The unpredictable nature of Jettomero’s movements were refined over time but there’s still a wildness to it that I feel is essential to the character.

Jettomero: Hero of the Universe

The story in its loosest form was one of the first things I knew I wanted in the game. Jettomero’s goal to save the humans is constantly at odds with its clumsiness. How can a being capable of so much destruction but with so little control ever be a hero? It’s a bit of a tragic comedy as far as I’m concerned. Overall, I wanted to create a relatable character, and I know I see more than just a little of myself in Jettomero, as I’m sure many others will too.

Jettomero is a very personal project and I’m always so happy to see when others connect with it. Being able to share this strange and unique experience with you is incredibly exciting. I sincerely hope you enjoy your time with Jettomero!



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“Meditative narrative toy” Jettomero: Hero of the Universe hits PS4 next Tuesday

Hello, I’m Gabriel, the lone developer of Jettomero: Hero of the Universe. I’m thrilled to be able to announce that on 27th February 2018 Jettomero will be landing on PS4 at last!

Jettomero has been my passion project for over 2 years. If I had to choose a genre to properly describe it I might go with “Meditative Narrative Toy”. Being a solo developer I was free to experiment and take risks with this game. I found the development process very organic; the feel, the look, the sound all formed around one another into something I think is unlike anything I’ve played before.

TITLE

Taking inspiration from such magical games as Hohokum, Noby Noby Boy and Proteus, I wanted to create something that was playful and beautiful. A strong aesthetic was something I strived for from the beginning and a friendly and accessible experience always sat at the core.

The visual style of the game is what most people notice right away about Jettomero. Through rigorous iteration I eventually settled on a striking comic-like look, drawing on a fantastic history of stylized galaxies from many amazing artists over the years. This style went on to shape many more elements of the game, in some ways Jettomero is a lot like an interactive comic book. The game’s flexible photo mode also provided a way to elaborate on various experiments, handing off a wide variety of filters to view and tweak at any moment.

TITLE TITLETITLE

 

As a musician, creating the soundtrack to Jettomero was a highlight for me. I knew from the start that I’d want to record everything using analog synthesizers and electronic drum machines. I recorded a lot of music for the game but all the final tracks are a cohesive down-tempo set, setting a dark but calming mood for the zen experience of the rest of the game.

While the soundtrack plays to the darker themes of Jettomero, the controls quickly became a very humorous endeavour. I’m not much of an animator myself so it worked out especially well that I developed a procedural animation system for Jettomero. The giant robot struggles to walk in a straight line and wobbles from left to right at every turn, but this played completely into a crucial aspect of the game’s story as well. The unpredictable nature of Jettomero’s movements were refined over time but there’s still a wildness to it that I feel is essential to the character.

TITLE

The story in its loosest form was one of the first things I knew I wanted in the game. Jettomero’s goal to save the humans is constantly at odds with its clumsiness. How can a being capable of so much destruction but with so little control ever be a hero? It’s a bit of a tragic comedy as far as I’m concerned. Overall, I wanted to create a relatable character, and I know I see more than just a little of myself in Jettomero, as I’m sure many others will too.

Jettomero is a very personal project and I’m always so happy to see when others connect with it. Being able to share this strange and unique experience with you is incredibly exciting. I sincerely hope you enjoy your time with Jettomero!

The post “Meditative narrative toy” Jettomero: Hero of the Universe hits PS4 next Tuesday appeared first on PlayStation.Blog.Europe.



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Blog: How I started programming - Part 1

Part one of the Trent Polack origin story: a rambling tale that'll hopefully offer some help to those looking to get started in games. ...



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