Saturday, 10 March 2018

Play With Gilbert Developer Talks Game Design With His Daughter

playWithGilbert_i1.jpg

The world of game design is tough. You have to keep functionality, integrity, and entertainment value in balance for a great concoction. Now, try mixing in the imagination of a child and their wild ideas - maintaining that balance is a whole lot trickier!

Joure Visser is the developer for a game called Play With Gilbert, in which players play as cat who explores and collects fish, which has evolved for the better from his daughter's suggestions. In an interview with IndieGames.com, he talks about the challenges of designing with his daughter's requests, the bond formed over the game's development, and where Play With Gilbert will go in the future.

playWithGilbert_i2.jpg

Play With Gilbert was a creation made by you for your daughter, and is ever-evolving with her feedback and requests. What sort of things does she ask for? How do you take these requests and translate them into your game?

Early on, I determined that my Xbox 360 controller would be the input device. The first problem I faced was creating a control scheme/layout that she was comfortable with after seeing her struggle trying to work two thumbsticks at the same time, which is a lot to ask for a kid her age. I was able to create an effective enough control scheme where the camera would turn with the character, making her be able to control Gilbert using only one thumbstick. While I wasn't a big fan, I noticed she was able to instantly move the kitty around and she started exploring. Mission accomplished!

What challenges have you faced in turning a child's desires into a game? In following someone else's design ideas and mingling them with your own development experience?

Development went pretty smooth in most ways. I roughly know what she'll like (in general), but there have been times where I thought she'd love something and she didn't, and something I put lesser thought into would turn out to be something she loved. She loves slides, for instance, so I added a few more of them and I want to add even more, longer, more extravagant ones at that.

The real challenge is trying to implement something which is really just out there. She wanted a flying kitty, but I never intended that kind of freedom. So, while I'm currently overhauling the game, I am prototyping these kinds of features to see if I can at least have something along those lines in there.

I currently have two ideas in my head for two different powerups: a jetpack/rocket. These will allow for more forward thrust to cover longer distances. I'm also thinking of a glide mechanic so you can glide down and reach places you might not otherwise be able to.

The biggest challenge so far, though, has been making sure she is able to reach the win states in every level. As long as she was capable of doing that, I knew that it was doable and therefore, in theory, would make the game have the correct difficulty, at least for my target audience.

playWithGilbert_i3.jpg


Have you had to turn down any of your daughter's requests?

Constantly. While I will always try to listen to her requests ("Can the kitty drive the car, daddy?"), most of the time I won't be able to purely because of my own limitations, or because her request is at stake with any sense of gameplay, balance, etc. However, I was testing a new jump feature one day and it ended up propelling the kitty towards the sky, hitting the invisible ceiling and making it look like he was flying. The obvious question followed: "Can you make the kitty fly, daddy?".

Obviously, it's possible, but I've had no experience, yet, with flying characters at the time. However, as I mentioned above, I am at this very point in time testing a possible rocket/jetpack feature because I know it'll make my daughter have fun, and while testing I can see some fun possibilities with it. Another idea I want to prototype is giving the kitty a wing accessory which lets him/her glide down gently. In other words, she made me think about power-ups. So, in this case, I had to turn her request down initially, but I am able to surprise her soon with this new ability. :)

As your daughter grows older, have her suggestions and playstyle evolved? Does she make more detailed requests? Is it tricky to try to fulfill the new requests?

It's one of the reasons that Play With Gilbert (Gilbert) is still evolving. While I want to keep the same entry bar for other kids her age, I do feel the lack of more challenging gameplay elements, and I see a lot of fun new ways to re-use existing assets.

As long as there's new thing for her to discover, she'll come back to the game - certainly once I'm done with the new revamp that I'm working on. For instance, the entire character movement has been updated. The two thumbsticks are back, yet the character can still be controlled through one thumbstick. On top of that, the character moves so much more intuitively now, too, making Play with Gilbert all that much better a game to introduce kids to platform games.

What are some observations you made of her style that helped influence design?

Well, I decided to make Gilbert an open world sandbox type of game because she loves to explore and just run around. She was new to games so simplicity was key. I wanted to avoid anything overly complicated. In the end, as long as she could get the fireworks to play, I was happy. Her love for animals was also a major influence. Other than that, I would say I just wanted to create a world that wasn't overly cartoony, but still bright and cheerful.

playWithGilbert_i4.jpg

You've gotten feedback from other players - an older audience (some of which are enjoying with their children) - and you've stated you'd like to revamp the game to incorporate that feedback. Will the target audience change with this revamp to allow parents to enjoy the game with their children? How so/not?

I am currently working on Gilbert 2.0. This will feature all new levels made from the ground up with more verticality and a lot more traditional gameplay in mind. You will now have to collect the correct number of fish to be able to unlock new areas, and each new area is also filled with fish to collect. I got inspired a lot by Mario Odyssey, so expect some influence from that game to work its way into Gilbert.

I also am adding new accessories, some in the form of powerups. Think of a jet pack or cute angel wings that will make your kitty glide down in grace. Well that's the plan. Besides the rocket, I am still prototyping these new mechanics.

I'm entertaining the idea of giving the kittens a lot more personality and their own names, as well as see if I can play around with funny little symbols and icons to visualize their mood or emotions. Maybe do so through spoken text dialogues, and give them random points of interest in a map. So, they might switch from playing ball to go meet up with a friend or just roam around, for instance.

The idea is to re-build on the foundation of the original game while completely revamping the entire game at the same time. From what I've seen so far in the new map, she's having a blast and that's without half of the new changes being implemented yet.

The thing with having a community is picking out things that should've been obvious, but because I am human, I didn't pick up on them. It's also because my daughter was at the helm and I didn't intend to sell Gilbert at the time. I will always try to listen to people as much as I am able to, but I will also always follow my own vision. That's why I prefer a fluid and organic approach. I can always change my mind, or work an awesome idea into my game thanks to feedback.

I am certainly not changing the game's demographic or target audience; I am simply noticing them and I am doing my best to also cater to them as well. I am just not sacrificing what Gilbert is at its core just to cater to a larger audience. Instead I am adding that layer into the game in a way that young and old can enjoy them.

I was surprised to see the number of older people playing the game, and it felt like I made a mistake. I still feel I have, but I am inexperienced in this area, haha.

playWithGilbert_i5.jpg

What do you find that children value the most in their games?

I can't say much about other kids - age also matters - but for my daughter I noticed she valued freedom the most. So, some of the new levels should be more spacious. That, and just being able to interact with things. So I am trying to do a bit more with that too.

I also noticed that, despite adding more gameplay, features, etc, she will more often than not simply ignore all that and just have fun. Running around without a goal in mind and just do stuff. I want to keep that ability in the game as much as possible.

Is it easier to develop for children or adults? How so/not?

In my case, so far, I haven't felt much of a difference. I mean, Gilbert was never planned. Unlike my main project, which is a more mature adventure game, I haven't felt that much difference. I do like to hear about other parents opinions and how their kids enjoyed the game.

I think that if you have fun making the game and it's an honest game, people will enjoy playing it. They will pick up on your dedication and the care you put into it. As long as they had a good time, I'm happy. That is the end goal.

Do you feel you've grown closer to your daughter over the course of making the game together? What has this work done for your relationship with her?

A ton. I hope I can keep doing this and bring her onto the next game I'll make for her. I got to learn a lot about the kind of person she is. Little things that'll go on to define her personality in large or small ways. It's also funny to discover certain traits that she got from me. Just simply observing the way she goes about things, I see myself in a lot of things she does when I was smaller.

Luckily, I have a strong relationship with her, and having done this has added another layer to it. I used to do stuff with my mom a lot when I was growing up. My dad had to work a lot. He'd gotten into an accident when I was 5. He's been disabled since then. While I have a strong bond with my dad, we missed out on so many things because of that.

My daughter is turning five in a few months, and I'm glad I have a bond with her. While I work long days, I do take time off here and there to spend time with her and my wife.

I urge every parent to do something with their kid to try and get them involved a little bit with what you do, if possible of course. I make games. It's easier for me to share with her. I guess maybe that's a perk of being a developer and a father. ;)

You can purchase Play with Gilbert on Steam here! You can also follow the developer on Twitter and YouTube!



from IndieGames.com http://ift.tt/2Diit2m

Play With Gilbert Developer Talks Game Design With His Daughter

playWithGilbert_i1.jpg

The world of game design is tough. You have to keep functionality, integrity, and entertainment value in balance for a great concoction. Now, try mixing in the imagination of a child and their wild ideas - maintaining that balance is a whole lot trickier!

Joure Visser is the developer for a game called Play With Gilbert, in which players play as cat who explores and collects fish, which has evolved for the better from his daughter's suggestions. In an interview with IndieGames.com, he talks about the challenges of designing with his daughter's requests, the bond formed over the game's development, and where Play With Gilbert will go in the future.

playWithGilbert_i2.jpg

Play With Gilbert was a creation made by you for your daughter, and is ever-evolving with her feedback and requests. What sort of things does she ask for? How do you take these requests and translate them into your game?

Early on, I determined that my Xbox 360 controller would be the input device. The first problem I faced was creating a control scheme/layout that she was comfortable with after seeing her struggle trying to work two thumbsticks at the same time, which is a lot to ask for a kid her age. I was able to create an effective enough control scheme where the camera would turn with the character, making her be able to control Gilbert using only one thumbstick. While I wasn't a big fan, I noticed she was able to instantly move the kitty around and she started exploring. Mission accomplished!

What challenges have you faced in turning a child's desires into a game? In following someone else's design ideas and mingling them with your own development experience?

Development went pretty smooth in most ways. I roughly know what she'll like (in general), but there have been times where I thought she'd love something and she didn't, and something I put lesser thought into would turn out to be something she loved. She loves slides, for instance, so I added a few more of them and I want to add even more, longer, more extravagant ones at that.

The real challenge is trying to implement something which is really just out there. She wanted a flying kitty, but I never intended that kind of freedom. So, while I'm currently overhauling the game, I am prototyping these kinds of features to see if I can at least have something along those lines in there.

I currently have two ideas in my head for two different powerups: a jetpack/rocket. These will allow for more forward thrust to cover longer distances. I'm also thinking of a glide mechanic so you can glide down and reach places you might not otherwise be able to.

The biggest challenge so far, though, has been making sure she is able to reach the win states in every level. As long as she was capable of doing that, I knew that it was doable and therefore, in theory, would make the game have the correct difficulty, at least for my target audience.

playWithGilbert_i3.jpg


Have you had to turn down any of your daughter's requests?

Constantly. While I will always try to listen to her requests ("Can the kitty drive the car, daddy?"), most of the time I won't be able to purely because of my own limitations, or because her request is at stake with any sense of gameplay, balance, etc. However, I was testing a new jump feature one day and it ended up propelling the kitty towards the sky, hitting the invisible ceiling and making it look like he was flying. The obvious question followed: "Can you make the kitty fly, daddy?".

Obviously, it's possible, but I've had no experience, yet, with flying characters at the time. However, as I mentioned above, I am at this very point in time testing a possible rocket/jetpack feature because I know it'll make my daughter have fun, and while testing I can see some fun possibilities with it. Another idea I want to prototype is giving the kitty a wing accessory which lets him/her glide down gently. In other words, she made me think about power-ups. So, in this case, I had to turn her request down initially, but I am able to surprise her soon with this new ability. :)

As your daughter grows older, have her suggestions and playstyle evolved? Does she make more detailed requests? Is it tricky to try to fulfill the new requests?

It's one of the reasons that Play With Gilbert (Gilbert) is still evolving. While I want to keep the same entry bar for other kids her age, I do feel the lack of more challenging gameplay elements, and I see a lot of fun new ways to re-use existing assets.

As long as there's new thing for her to discover, she'll come back to the game - certainly once I'm done with the new revamp that I'm working on. For instance, the entire character movement has been updated. The two thumbsticks are back, yet the character can still be controlled through one thumbstick. On top of that, the character moves so much more intuitively now, too, making Play with Gilbert all that much better a game to introduce kids to platform games.

What are some observations you made of her style that helped influence design?

Well, I decided to make Gilbert an open world sandbox type of game because she loves to explore and just run around. She was new to games so simplicity was key. I wanted to avoid anything overly complicated. In the end, as long as she could get the fireworks to play, I was happy. Her love for animals was also a major influence. Other than that, I would say I just wanted to create a world that wasn't overly cartoony, but still bright and cheerful.

playWithGilbert_i4.jpg

You've gotten feedback from other players - an older audience (some of which are enjoying with their children) - and you've stated you'd like to revamp the game to incorporate that feedback. Will the target audience change with this revamp to allow parents to enjoy the game with their children? How so/not?

I am currently working on Gilbert 2.0. This will feature all new levels made from the ground up with more verticality and a lot more traditional gameplay in mind. You will now have to collect the correct number of fish to be able to unlock new areas, and each new area is also filled with fish to collect. I got inspired a lot by Mario Odyssey, so expect some influence from that game to work its way into Gilbert.

I also am adding new accessories, some in the form of powerups. Think of a jet pack or cute angel wings that will make your kitty glide down in grace. Well that's the plan. Besides the rocket, I am still prototyping these new mechanics.

I'm entertaining the idea of giving the kittens a lot more personality and their own names, as well as see if I can play around with funny little symbols and icons to visualize their mood or emotions. Maybe do so through spoken text dialogues, and give them random points of interest in a map. So, they might switch from playing ball to go meet up with a friend or just roam around, for instance.

The idea is to re-build on the foundation of the original game while completely revamping the entire game at the same time. From what I've seen so far in the new map, she's having a blast and that's without half of the new changes being implemented yet.

The thing with having a community is picking out things that should've been obvious, but because I am human, I didn't pick up on them. It's also because my daughter was at the helm and I didn't intend to sell Gilbert at the time. I will always try to listen to people as much as I am able to, but I will also always follow my own vision. That's why I prefer a fluid and organic approach. I can always change my mind, or work an awesome idea into my game thanks to feedback.

I am certainly not changing the game's demographic or target audience; I am simply noticing them and I am doing my best to also cater to them as well. I am just not sacrificing what Gilbert is at its core just to cater to a larger audience. Instead I am adding that layer into the game in a way that young and old can enjoy them.

I was surprised to see the number of older people playing the game, and it felt like I made a mistake. I still feel I have, but I am inexperienced in this area, haha.

playWithGilbert_i5.jpg

What do you find that children value the most in their games?

I can't say much about other kids - age also matters - but for my daughter I noticed she valued freedom the most. So, some of the new levels should be more spacious. That, and just being able to interact with things. So I am trying to do a bit more with that too.

I also noticed that, despite adding more gameplay, features, etc, she will more often than not simply ignore all that and just have fun. Running around without a goal in mind and just do stuff. I want to keep that ability in the game as much as possible.

Is it easier to develop for children or adults? How so/not?

In my case, so far, I haven't felt much of a difference. I mean, Gilbert was never planned. Unlike my main project, which is a more mature adventure game, I haven't felt that much difference. I do like to hear about other parents opinions and how their kids enjoyed the game.

I think that if you have fun making the game and it's an honest game, people will enjoy playing it. They will pick up on your dedication and the care you put into it. As long as they had a good time, I'm happy. That is the end goal.

Do you feel you've grown closer to your daughter over the course of making the game together? What has this work done for your relationship with her?

A ton. I hope I can keep doing this and bring her onto the next game I'll make for her. I got to learn a lot about the kind of person she is. Little things that'll go on to define her personality in large or small ways. It's also funny to discover certain traits that she got from me. Just simply observing the way she goes about things, I see myself in a lot of things she does when I was smaller.

Luckily, I have a strong relationship with her, and having done this has added another layer to it. I used to do stuff with my mom a lot when I was growing up. My dad had to work a lot. He'd gotten into an accident when I was 5. He's been disabled since then. While I have a strong bond with my dad, we missed out on so many things because of that.

My daughter is turning five in a few months, and I'm glad I have a bond with her. While I work long days, I do take time off here and there to spend time with her and my wife.

I urge every parent to do something with their kid to try and get them involved a little bit with what you do, if possible of course. I make games. It's easier for me to share with her. I guess maybe that's a perk of being a developer and a father. ;)

You can purchase Play with Gilbert on Steam here! You can also follow the developer on Twitter and YouTube!



from IndieGames.com http://ift.tt/2Diit2m

Guardian with a Kill Mark

You know you’re in a target rich environment when even logi manages to get a kill mark.

Our fleet at the scene

A Nidhoggur tried to interrupt what was supposed to be a quick bubble clear op, got trapped, got a Lif dropped for support, then dreads, and then a fleet of bombers.  The latter dropped piecemeal at fairly close range and engaged us with torpedoes leading to a situation one might call a “feed.”

The end was a bunch of dead ships on the field, most of which were theirs.

Wrecks around the station, our cap chain visible in the distance

We escalated as well and sacrificed some dreads to kill their caps, but the end result was very much in our favor according to the battle report.

Battle Report Summary

And we got all the bubbles cleared in the end as well.  Op success.

And, since I mentioned it in the title, I suppose I had better show it off in the post.

Kill mark in the red circle

That little mark means I managed to get the final blow on somebody’s ship.



from The Ancient Gaming Noob http://ift.tt/2Gd70Ej

Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy Is Now Available For Digital Pre-order And Pre-download On Xbox One

Content: Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy
Check pre-order price and availability in your Xbox LIVE region

Game Description: You may pre-download this game, but it will not be playable until release date (07/09/2018 – 9:00 PM).

Your favorite marsupial, Crash Bandicoot, is back! He’s enhanced, entranced and ready-to-dance with the N. Sane Trilogy game collection. Now you can experience Crash Bandicoot like never before. Spin, jump, wump and repeat as you take on the epic challenges and adventures through the three games that started it all, Crash Bandicoot, Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back and Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped. Relive all your favorite Crash moments in their fully-remastered graphical glory and get ready to put some UMPH in your WUMP!

Xbox One Pre-Order FAQ



from Xbox Live's Major Nelson http://ift.tt/2FGoUSd

'Fortnite: Battle Royale' Cross-Play Adds Xbox Support

If you're a Fortnite fan that was disappointed that you couldn't do cross-play with Xbox Battle Royale players, then good news: Epic just announced that the Xbox version is getting cross-play and cross-progression with the PC and mobile versions of the game. There was some thought that politics got in the way, but Epic made special note to say that wasn't the case:

Contrary to what may have been implied, Microsoft has long been a leading voice in supporting cross-platform play, connecting players across PC, mobile and all consoles. We’ve been working together with them over the last several months to make this possible, and will bring this functionality to Fortnite players on Xbox right along with other platforms.

Now, there is one thing to note: it doesn't appear that cross-play will work between PS4 and Xbox. Specifically, Epic's news says "between Xbox One, PC, Mac, iOS and (in the next few months) Android." Sony and Microsoft historically have never allowed cross-play between systems, even though it should be quite apparent that there is not a significant technical hurdle to make this happen.

We can look at another significant title with cross-play, Rocket League, and see two things. One, Psyonix's Jeremy Dunham says that adding PS4 cross-play to the game is "literally something we could do with a push of a button, metaphorically. In reality it’s a web page with a checkbox on it. All we have to do is check that box and it would be up and running in less than an hour all over the world. That’s all we need to do.” So it's strange that Sony wouldn't allow cross-play...but would for Fortnite? Perhaps the need to use an Epic Games account for cross-progression was the stopping point for Microsoft, which has its own ecosystem between Windows 10 and Xbox to support.

So cross-platform play is purely a political issue. And it's quite possible that the announcement of the mobile versions of Fortnite pressured Microsoft into finally allowing cross-platform play. While Rocket League is a big game, it's a few years old, and the furor over the Switch version and cross-platform play passed. But Fortnite is the hottest game on the planet right now, and not having cross-play got Microsoft a lot of bad press, and possibly is bad for business if it convinces people to go play another version to play with their friends.

So, once Fortnite launches on mobile, you'll be able to play with just about anyone, until Sony and Microsoft finally get together, realize they should let people play against each other regardless of which platform they're on. Interestingly, the Fortnite Xbox cross-platform announcement also contains this note about mobile getting the "same weekly updates." Certainly, nobody would be able to reasonably fault Epic for perhaps having the iOS version on Monday not be completely up to date with the other builds if there is still work to be done to make Fortnite work well on iOS. But what if on Monday, testers are playing build 3.2 on their iPhones and iPads? That would be quite the impressive accomplishment. Fortnite: Battle Royale for iPhone and iPad testing opens on Monday, March 12th.



from TouchArcade http://ift.tt/2FwPDNM

Daily Deal - Gremlins, Inc., 50% Off

Today's Deal: Save 50% on Gremlins, Inc.!*

Look for the deals each day on the front page of Steam. Or follow us on twitter or Facebook for instant notifications wherever you are!

*Offer ends Monday at 10AM Pacific Time


from Steam RSS News Feed http://ift.tt/2tAMivH

"Hooray! Valve is going to start shipping games again"

Steam and Vive have preoccupied Valve in recent years but the revered creator of Half-Life has vowed to "start shipping games again".

Word comes from Valve co-founder and president Gabe Newell, who was presenting Dota 2 card game Artifact to press at the company's offices in Bellevue, Washington. (Dota 2, incidentally, was Valve's last major release back in 2013.)

"Artifact is the first of several games that are going to be coming from us, so that's sort of good news," Newell said, reported by PC Gamer. "Hooray! Valve is going to start shipping games again."

Read more…



from Eurogamer.net http://ift.tt/2DelLDL

Carter is Back ... Again! - The TouchArcade Show #345

Eli was returning from basking in the presence of Gaben, so it's the Jared Nelson and Carter Dotson show again this week on The TouchArcade Show. They discuss a bunch of this week's news stories, including the bombshell that Fortnite's coming to mobile. Then, they discuss a few of this week's new releases: The Sims Mobile [appprice url="http://ift.tt/2oZXrRX}, Read Only Memories: Type-M [Free], and Baldur's Gate: Siege of Dragonspear [$9.99].

Eli Note: Sorry for posting this a little late, I got home super under the weather last night!

Don't forget to shoot us emails with any questions, feedback, or anything else relevant or irrelevant to podcast@toucharcade.com. We read 'em all, and love decoding messages written entirely in emoji. As always, you can listen to us with the links below... And if you like what you hear, please subscribe and/or drop us a review in iTunes. Much appreciated!

As a companion to this audio podcast, we also do a video version of the same show that is exclusive to Patreon which allows you to see us playing the games we're talking about. Backers can view the most recent video episodes of the TouchArcade show by clicking here. Be sure you're logged in to see the latest content. For everyone else who is curious, you can check out our public patreon posts to see older episodes of the video podcast. If you like what you see, consider becoming a TouchArcade Patreon backer.

iTunes Link: The TouchArcade Show
Stitcher: The TouchArcade Show via Stitcher Radio for Podcasts [Free]
RSS Feed: The TouchArcade Show
Direct Link: TouchArcadeShow-345.mp3, 82MB



from TouchArcade http://ift.tt/2HmDqvA

Final Fantasy 15's PC port unlocks the game's full visual potential

There's always been the sense that we've not been able to experience the definitive version of Final Fantasy 15, that today's console hardware simply doesn't have the horsepower to fully deliver the developers' original vision for the game. PlayStation 4 and Xbox One X have upped resolution and increased fidelity over the original releases, but fundamentally, there's still the sense that the game just has much more to offer. Only now with the release of the PC version do we get to see the Luminous Studios engine fully unleashed. Yes, the hardware demands can be onerous - staggering even - if you want to see everything but the visual return is outstanding.

First of all, the final code is improved over its initial outing in the benchmark released last month - GameWorks and other level of detail issues are greatly improved and overall frame-rates are higher, but AMD performance is still not quite where it should be - something we'll be looking at in more depth later on. For now, we'll be looking at the tangible benefits of playing Final Fantasy 15 on PC - and they are legion.

First of all, there are the basics: performance and resolution. Square-Enix's port has the exclusive full-screen and v-sync options bizarrely omitted from the benchmark, along with a vast range of tweakables to experiment with, but the fundamentals are in place too: arbitrary resolutions are supported as is ultra-wide support (we ran a lot of the game at the decidedly non-standard 3840x1600 and everything just worked fine) while in-game frame-rates up to 120fps are confirmed.

Read more…



from Eurogamer.net http://ift.tt/2tBDi9k

Space Shooter Cycle 28 Has You Reliving The Same Day All Over Again

cycle28.jpg
"Every time you drop from warp they're there. Then you die."

Pill Bug Interactive's Cycle 28 is a space shooter with a narrative twist. It feels a lot like Asteroids and Luftrausers had a baby: zooming around space battlefields, carried by your momentum, you shoot down everything that moves.

Breaking your own high score nets you upgrades. It takes a while to get used to the game's fast-paced dogfights, but once you're comfortable with the controls, you'll see your score rising with each subsequent attempt.

This is not just an arcade game, mind - there is a mystery to it all. You're playing as a pilot who's been warped right into enemy territory for some reason and who's more than eager to return to the fleet. However, each failed attempt just resets your cycle, having you replay the same scenario all over again.

It's not a total reset, though, as the story goes on, presenting you with a new piece of the puzzle now and then. This is quite motivating and might bring you to stick with the game for much longer than you normally would. Also, slowly working your way up the leaderboards has been surprisingly satisfying for me, even though I am still nowhere near the top.

Cycle 28 might not reinvent the space shooter genre, but it's narrative trappings make it more than well worth a look.

You can purchase Cycle 28 from Steam for $4.99. For more information, visit the game's website or follow developer Pill Bug Interactive on Facebook or Twitter.



from IndieGames.com http://ift.tt/2HiYcfq

Space Shooter Cycle 28 Has You Reliving The Same Day All Over Again

cycle28.jpg
"Every time you drop from warp they're there. Then you die."

Pill Bug Interactive's Cycle 28 is a space shooter with a narrative twist. It feels a lot like Asteroids and Luftrausers had a baby: zooming around space battlefields, carried by your momentum, you shoot down everything that moves.

Breaking your own high score nets you upgrades. It takes a while to get used to the game's fast-paced dogfights, but once you're comfortable with the controls, you'll see your score rising with each subsequent attempt.

This is not just an arcade game, mind - there is a mystery to it all. You're playing as a pilot who's been warped right into enemy territory for some reason and who's more than eager to return to the fleet. However, each failed attempt just resets your cycle, having you replay the same scenario all over again.

It's not a total reset, though, as the story goes on, presenting you with a new piece of the puzzle now and then. This is quite motivating and might bring you to stick with the game for much longer than you normally would. Also, slowly working your way up the leaderboards has been surprisingly satisfying for me, even though I am still nowhere near the top.

Cycle 28 might not reinvent the space shooter genre, but it's narrative trappings make it more than well worth a look.

You can purchase Cycle 28 from Steam for $4.99. For more information, visit the game's website or follow developer Pill Bug Interactive on Facebook or Twitter.



from IndieGames.com http://ift.tt/2HiYcfq

Review: Guilt Battle Arena (Switch eShop)

Review: Review: Guilt Battle Arena (Switch eShop)

Fast and furious



from Nintendo Life | Latest Updates http://ift.tt/2HmfZlX

Overwatch League takes disciplinary action against four players

Overnight the Overwatch League announced disciplinary action against four players, including a second fine and suspension for Dallas Fuel player Félix "xQc" Lengyel. He had previously been suspended for four games and fined $2000 back in January.

Lengyel has been penalised for "repeatedly" using an emote "in a racially disparaging manner", according to the OWL statement, and using "disparaging language" against Overwatch League casters and fellow players.

The emote in question is the TriHard emote, which shows the face of speedrunner Trihex frozen in an awkward grin. It's one of the most-used emotes on Twitch but its meaning has been perverted by toxic communities and become synonymous with racial abuse, typically spammed when a person of colour appears on a Twitch stream.

Read more…



from Eurogamer.net http://ift.tt/2oZwOwx

Jelly Deals roundup: Nintendo Labo, Firewatch, Blue Yeti mics and more

Another week has passed us by which means, as we all know by now, that it is time to take a look at a whole batch of the best gaming deals the internet has to offer these past seven days.

As usual, we've got deals that'll work in the UK, deals that'll work in the US and some deals that will work in both the UK and US, as well as presumably many other places. Let's get started.

This week's batch of titles on offer as part of GOG's Weekly Sale is a particularly nice one. Headlined by Firewatch for £5.99, you'll find a lot of action, some strategy and a healthy dose of adventure games, all with up to 85 per cent off.

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from Eurogamer.net http://ift.tt/2p4bANd

Talking Point: What Games Are You Playing This Weekend?

Talking Point: Talking Point: What Games Are You Playing This Weekend?

These are our picks, but what are yours?



from Nintendo Life | Latest Updates http://ift.tt/2If8mPC

Need For Speed Payback Free Download

Need For Speed Payback Free Download PC Game setup in single direct link for Windows. It is an amazing action, adventure and racing game.
Need For Speed Payback Free Download PC Game 2018 Overview
Need for Speed™, one of the world’s bestselling video game franchises returns with a vengeance in the [...]

The post Need For Speed Payback Free Download appeared first on Ocean of Games.



from Ocean of Games http://ift.tt/2p7Ho3U

Chessaria The Tactical Adventure Free Download

Chessaria The Tactical Adventure Free Download PC Game setup in single direct link for Windows. It is an amazing adventure, indie and strategy game.
Chessaria The Tactical Adventure Free Download PC Game 2018 Overview
Enter the world of Chessaria, the turn-based tactical game that combines an epic [...]

The post Chessaria The Tactical Adventure Free Download appeared first on Ocean of Games.



from Ocean of Games http://ift.tt/2IdpuFs

Hearts of Iron IV Waking the Tiger Free Download

Hearts of Iron IV Waking the Tiger Free Download PC Game setup in single direct link for Windows. It is an amazing simulation and strategy game.
Hearts of Iron IV Waking the Tiger Free Download PC Game 2018 Overview
Years before Europe went to war, Japan’s imperial ambitions targeted the divided [...]

The post Hearts of Iron IV Waking the Tiger Free Download appeared first on Ocean of Games.



from Ocean of Games http://ift.tt/2FqPxvd

The Drop: New PlayStation Games for 3/13/2018

Start your engines. The beloved action racer returns with Burnout Paradise Remastered on PS4.

Race through bustling city streets and winding mountain roads, serving up stunts and destruction in equal measure. Burnout Paradise Remastered includes the eight main DLC packs and more than 100 playable vehicles. Play solo or with friends and see how much chaos you can leave in the rearview mirror.

For a full list of games coming to PlayStation next week, read on. And enjoy The Drop!

The Drop

New Releases: Week of March 13, 2018
The 25th Ward: The Silver Case
PS4 — Digital, Retail

25th Ward The Silver Case

Follow the threads in a grim psychological thriller and discover the darkness at the heart of Kanto’s newly built 25th Ward.

Alchemist’s Castle
PS4 — Digital (Out 3/15)

Alchemists Castle

Discovering the philosopher’s stone turned the wise and kind alchemist into a power hungry, selfish tyrant. The task of stopping him falls upon you, the former apprentice of the alchemist.

The American Dream
PS VR — Digital (Out 3/14)

American Dream

Samurai Punk presents The American Dream, a satirical virtual reality trip to a “brighter” future.

Armello
PS4 — Retail

Armello

Armello is a grim fairy-tale board game come to life. Full of swashbuckling adventure combining deep, tactical card play, rich tabletop strategy, and RPG elements.

Beast Quest
PS4 — Digital, Retail

Game listed in error, release date corrected.

Burnout Paradise Remastered
PS4 — Digital, Retail (Out 3/16)

Burnout Paradise Remastered

Welcome back to Paradise City! Make action your middle name as you rule the streets in Burnout Paradise Remastered.

The Council
PS4 — Digital

Council

The Council is an episodic game like no other. Delivering a fresh take on the narrative adventure, your choices and character growth truly matter.

Cruz Brothers
PS4 — Digital

Cruz Brothers

After the murder of his best fighter by the hands of Tray Sorrow, leader of the Sons of Subversion. Coach Marcus Luz becomes discredited in life and in the fighting world.

Devil May Cry HD Collection
PS4 — Digital, Retail

Devil May Cry HD Collection

The popular stylish action games Devil May Cry, Devil May Cry 2, and Devil May Cry 3 Special Edition return in one collection!

Gal Gunvolt Burst
PS4 — Digital (Out 3/15)

Gal Gunvolt

Enter a virtual world of cyber-landscapes and unravel the mystery behind its creation!

Hakuoki: Edo Blossoms
PS Vita — Digital, Retail

Hakuoki

This is a story about a girl who allies with the warriors of the Shinsengumi, who are struggling to uphold their faith in an era of rapid social change in Japan, and the fate of those who sought to resist that change.

The Long Reach
PS4 — Digital

Long Reach

The Long Reach takes place in New Hampshire, in the fictional town of Baervox. The game draws its inspiration from Lone Survivor and The Cave and all the classical adventures (except that The Long Reach is set in the present day).

Maria the Witch
PS4 — Digital (Out 3/15)

Maria the witch

Zaki & Mia stole all the mail and spread it all over the world! Help Maria bring it back!

NeuroVoider
PS Vita — Digital (Out 3/15)

Game listed in error, release date corrected.

Pure Farming 2018
PS4 — Digital, Retail

Pure Farming 2018

Go global and expand your farming empire across four continents! Try your hand at all aspects of modern farming, such as animal husbandry, orchards, greenhouses, field cultivation, and green energy.

Q.U.B.E. 2
PS4 — Digital

QUBE 2

You are Amelia Cross, a stranded archaeologist who has mysteriously awoken among the sand swept ruins of an ancient alien landscape. Together with the distant help of another survivor, Commander Emma Sutcliffe, you must traverse and manipulate the structure of this forgotten world to find a way back home.

The Raven Remastered
PS4 — Digital, Retail

Raven Remastered

London, 1964. An ancient ruby is stolen from the British Museum. At the crime scene: a raven feather. Is somebody trying to follow in the footsteps of The Raven, the legendary master thief who disappeared years before?

Surviving Mars
PS4 — Digital, Retail (Out 3/15)

Surviving Mars

Surviving Mars challenges you to colonize Mars and survive the process. Use drones to prepare for human colonists. Create habitable living areas in grand domes, make discoveries, and build a new society.

Tesla vs. Lovecraft
PS4 — Digital

Tesla vs Lovecraft

On the eve of Nikola Tesla’s greatest invention, his laboratory is burned down by the inhuman minions of the horror author H.P. Lovecraft. A showdown of epic proportions begins!

Zeus Quest Remastered
PS4 — Digital (Out 3/15)

Zeus Quest

Zeus Quests Remastered is a silly point and click adventure game with light-hearted humor. It combines Greek mythology with sci-fi in a twisted way!

PlayStation Music Logo

PlayStation Video Logo

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

PlayStation Vue Logo

March Madness

March Madness

March Madness is coming March 13 on TBS, CBS, TNT, truTV & ncaa.com/MML. Watch every game live starting 3/13 @ 6p ET on truTV through PS Vue.

PlayStation Vue has your favorite sports, news and 
must-watch shows.

The information above is subject to change without notice.



from PlayStation.Blog http://ift.tt/2FpsZLf

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